Development of Vegan Burgers

Meat alternatives and other plant-based foods have been on the rise with increased awareness about climate change leading to the development of meatless meats. They have become more popular and increasingly available in grocery stores and restaurants to offer a lower emission and plant-based option.

Development of Vegan Burgers

Meatless Meats

Meatless meats are on the rise and you’ve probably seen or heard of these brands creating mock meats to reduce the environmental impact of traditionally carbon emissions-heavy foods. Brands like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat have made names for themselves recently, both having notable launches to the public back in 2016. 


Awareness of climate change and the impacts of high emissions foods such as beef led scientists to create an alternative that has a much lower environmental impact while replicating and fulfilling the enjoyment of a beef burger. Impossible Foods completed a life cycle analysis on their burgers and found that they had an 89% smaller environmental impact than a traditional beef burger. Beyond Meat also performed a life cycle analysis on their burgers and found Beyond burgers require 99% less water, 93% less land, 90% fewer greenhouse gas emissions, and 50% less energy. These two companies have made names for themselves with products that have reduced environmental impact without sacrificing the taste and texture of a beef patty.

 

If it’s not made from meat, then what is it made of?

Impossible Beef is made from soy for protein; heme and yeast extract for flavor; coconut and sunflower oils for fat; and methylcellulose and food starch as binders. Soy is a popular choice for plant-based protein and has been used for centuries with demand increasing drastically in the last 50 years according to data from Our World in Data. Although not all of it is consumed by humans, 77% is used as feed for livestock. Heme is an organic compound that Impossible Foods uses to make beef taste meaty. They use genetically engineered yeast with the gene for leghemoglobin (heme) to replicate the taste of meat as much as possible.

Beyond Beef is also a plant-based meat, however, they use peas, mung beans, faba beans, and brown rice as its protein source. They also use cocoa butter, coconut oil, and expeller-pressed canola oil for fats; potato starch and methylcellulose for carbohydrates and texture; calcium, iron salt, and potassium chloride for minerals; and beet juice and apple extract for color and taste.

Both companies strive for the essential texture and flavor that makes these plant-based meats feel and taste more like meat. These companies are popularly known for their burgers which have entered global markets and can be found in grocery stores and restaurants and have even entered the fast food industry as companies like Carl’s Jr. and Burger King as they compete with the rising demand for alternative meats. 

Veggie Burgers

Burgers are one of the most popular foods and no one wants to miss out on that which is why veggie burgers have been around to keep everyone included! While veggie patties are not meat or mock meat, they are perfect for people who want to skip the meat and the feel of it altogether. Over the years different ingredients to create numerous flavor profiles from patties in the frozen aisle at the grocery store to housemade patties in restaurants. 


The first to enter the market was the “VegeBurger” in a London-based restaurant in 1982, although recipes had been cited to an earlier date of 1969. Gregory Sams’s VegeBurger was leading the veggie burger product, going commercial in with a dried mix to be rehydrated. Since then, companies have produced different patties that you can find today like Boca, Morningstar, and Dr. Praegers. Even in-store brands like Trader Joe’s have created their own veggie patties like their Vegetable Masala Burger and their Hi-Protein Veggie Burger. However, we think the best veggie patties are the fresh, homemade ones.

Mountain Burger

Here at Mountain Burger, we have options for everyone. Maybe you want to go meatless and try the Mountain Cheeseburger with an Impossible patty or maybe you want to go for a housemade veggie patty. The options are here to fit your dietary needs and preferences so that you don’t have to worry about having an option on the menu. Our Manzanita patty on our Manzanita Melt and our sweet potato, black bean, and quinoa patty is a delicious house-made option for when you want to skip the meat or mock meat options, and the Impossible patty is always available for when you still want that burger feel but without the beef. Both of those patties are vegan and can be used to build your own for a delicious vegan creation! Our options help you meet your sustainability goals without sacrificing an evening out with friends and family. 

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